whssweetspring2021 project 9

Project by group whssweetspring2021

Info

Explore the important steps to getting food from farm to table. We learned that agronomy is the science of soil management and crop production. Plants need nutrients, water, and sunlight to grow. Also, we learned that we need to know what the soil type is when planting before applying fertilizers. We...
Research Question what are the important steps from getting food from farm to table? which fertilizer gives the best results for a quicker plant growth
Predictions raise healthy livestock. We believe that organic fertilizer (organic or inorganic) will give the best results for a faster plant growth and will also keep it healthy because of the fact that it has agricultural waste, livestock manure, and municipal sludge.
Experimental Design raise healthy livetsock
Conclusion raise healthy livestock and crops for farm to table. In conclusion, our prediction was right about organic fertilizer (organic or inorganic) giving the best results for a faster plant growth and keeping it healthy because of the fact that it has agricultural waste, livestock manure, and...

Updates

Get to know your team’s scientist mentor, who will encourage and guide you through the scientific process of discovery. The more you share your ideas and research info, the more your mentor can help. You may also hear from a scientist mentor liaison who will be helping all the teams in your class.
Erich Huebner
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Erich Huebner
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Erich Huebner
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Erich Huebner
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PlantingScience Staff
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PlantingScience Staff
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PlantingScience Staff
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Jennifer Bufford
said

It was great working with you on your project.  I hope you had fun exploring plants and agronomy!  All the best for the rest of your school year :)

Brenda L.
said

Thank you mentors for taking the time to work with us in this experiment. 

PlantingScience Staff
said

Farewell and Best Wishes

As this research project is now in the final stages of wrapping-up, we wish to thank everyone who participated in this inquiry; the students, mentors, teachers and others behind the scenes. We appreciate all of your efforts and contributions to this online learning community.

Scientific exploration is a process of discovery that can be fun! There are many unanswered questions about plants just waiting for new scientists to consider, investigate, and share.

After the end of the session, we will be updating the platform and archiving groups and projects, after which time new updates/posts will not be able to be added to projects or groups. You have until Tuesday, April 25, 2021, to post ALL of your updates, comments, and goodbyes. Please come back and visit the PlantingScience Project Gallery anytime to view this project in the future. You can search the Gallery by keyword, team name, topic, or school name.

Good bye for now.

Warm regards,

The PlantingScience Team

Brenda L.
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Brenda L.
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Brenda L.
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Brenda L.
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Brenda L.
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In today's class, our teacher conducted an experiment, where we saw what type of soil (clay or soil) would filter the most. We made a prediction and said that clay has bigger particles than soil and so it will filter out most of the dye from the water. The color sticks more to one type of soil (clay) than the other (soil) because of the fact that clay has bigger particles. This experiment reflects what happens in agriculture because you will know your soil better. An experiment we would like to test would be which fertilizer gives the best results for a quicker plant growth. 

Nutrients and water move through soil by this process called diffusion. During this process, roots grow throughout the profile and use up nutrients directly around the root system and the root hairs. As the concentration of nutrients around the root system drops, nutrients from higher concentrated areas move toward low concentration areas and toward the roots.

    Jennifer Bufford
    said

    Hi team,

    That sounds like an interesting experiment you did in class.  I wonder, though, about the difference in particles between sand and clay.  Have a look again at which is bigger.

    I like your idea of looking at fertilizer - that is a very practical question.  Besides the fertilizer you use, what else might influence which fertilizer is best in a particular field? 

    Jennifer

    INDIRA PAUDEL
    said

    Hi Brenda, this experiment looks really interesting to me. I assume you were talking about clay and sandy soil. Clay has a smaller particle size than other types of soils. Since they have smaller in size, they occupied more space (higher surface area), which makes them adsorb more fertilizers/die. As you said, we need to know the type of soil before we applied fertilizer in our agricultural field.

     

    Brenda L.
    said

    Hi Jennifer, 

    Sorry for answering your follow up question barely right now. Other factors that may influence which fertilizer is best in a particular field would be soil type, even distribution, caking and clumping and micronutrient/macronutrient segregation.

    Also, clay has a smaller particles than other types of soils. 

Brenda L.
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Brenda L.
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Brenda L.
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Brenda L.
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Jennifer Bufford
said

Hi team,

I like your logo :)  It's good to see that you've updated your info.  Your research question is an important one - we definitely need to get food from farm to table, but it's also really, really big.  When we're learning by reading a book or taking a class, we can learn a lot of different things at once, so you can ask big questions.  But when we're running an experiment, we have to do only a few small things at a time, so we can build up new knowledge carefully.  Ultimately, we answer the big questions by asking lots of small ones.

Here's an example of the difference I mean.  A big question would be, do people like candy?  This is hard to answer because there are lots of different kinds of candy and types of people, and "like" and "don't like" are hard to measure.  A good specific question for an experiment might be, "do high school students like skittles or M&Ms better?".  That is a question you could test by offering students a choice and seeing which ones they choose.

So, for you to be able to do a project or experiment, you need to make your question a lot smaller.  What is one small, specific thing about raising healthy crops that you would like to know more about and that we could test with an experiment?

Julie P.
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Julie P.
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Julie P.
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Julie P.
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Julie P.
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Julie P.
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Nadia A.
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Hi jennifer , The sources of stress that I have observed in plants have been around me are temperature on the plants, water resources, chemical stress, and insect stress. I seen that when watering a water too much water can then affect plants by then they will not be able to breathe by taking up oxygen with their roots. 

Jennifer Bufford
said

Hi Brenda & team,

Great answers about soil and key nutrients.  You're right that nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium are important and that's why they are key ingredients in fertilizers.  That's a pretty good list of stresses that plants face, too.  Are there any sources of stress for plants that you can observe around you right now?  How do the plants respond?

It sounds like you're learning a lot of new words right now, so maybe I can help you with a few of them.  You mentioned "autotrophs" - "auto" means self (like autobiography) and "troph" has to do with food.  So because plants make their own food (instead of eating other things), they are called "autotrophs".

"Bio" refers to life, so you're right that "biotic" stress has to do with living organisms.  Biotic stress is stress caused by other living organisms.  The insect stress you mentioned would be an example of "biotic" stress for a plant.

"A" is often used to indicate the opposite of something, so "abiotic" means not biotic, or not having to do with living organisms.  In other words, "abiotic" stress usually has to do with the environment, as you mentioned.  Temperature or water stress would be good examples of "abiotic" stress.

I hope that helps and I look forward to hearing more about your soil experiment :)

Jennifer

    Brenda L.
    said

    Hi Jennifer, 

    The sources of stress that I have observed in plants around me are temperature, water resources, chemical stress, and insect stress. I seen that too much water can affect plants and insect stress can too because of all the bugs that stick to plants.     

Jennifer Bufford
said

Hi team,

Nice to meet you all!  And congrats on making it to senior year of high school - you're almost done :)

My name's Jennifer and I study invasive plants.  Recently I have been studying a weed called dock that is a problem in organic agriculture and pastures.  Like you, I really liked science in high school, but I also really like being outside, so I decided to study how plants grow in the wild because that means I get to be outside sometimes when I'm working!

Ecoregions are an interesting way of classifying the world.  The climate is so different from one part of the world to another!  What ecoregion do you live in?  What kinds of crops do farmers in your area grow?

You mentioned climate, sunlight and water, but you also said a plant needs nutrients. What nutrients does a plant need and where do they come from?  What is the difference between biotic and abiotic stress?  What sources of stress do you think plants in your area have to deal with right now?

I'd also like to hear more about what you're doing in class.  Have you started talking about a project or experiment to work on?

I look forward to working with you on your project!

Jennifer

    Brenda L.
    said

    Hi Jennifer,

    The ecoregion I live in is California Mediterranean. Soil is a major source of nutrients needed by plants for growth. Other nutrients include  nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Plants get their nutrients from autotrophs. Biotic stress is stress that occurs as a res living organism. Abiotic stress is defined as the negative organism in a specific environment.  Temperature, water resources, chemical stress, and insect stress are some sources of stress that I think plants in Watsonville have dealt with.  The kinds of crops farmers in Watsonville grow are strawberries, lettuce and raspberries just to mention a few. Today we started working on an experiment about soil, the teacher will conducting it on friday. 

INDIRA PAUDEL
said

Hello team, Nice to catch you there. I hope you are enjoying this semester and can't wait to discuss your project. Good luck to you all!

INDIRA PAUDEL
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Jennifer Bufford
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Brenda L.
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In today's class, we learned that agronomy is the science and technology of producing and using plants in agriculture for food, fuel, fiber, recreation, and land restoration. It is important because it provides farmers with agricultural information about how to grow and care for plants and soils in certain environments. We also learned that an ecoregion is a major ecosystem defined by distinctive geography and receives uniform solar radiation and moisture. Climate affects plant growth because there is certain variables that make plants grow. Considering how climate can change randomly like extreme weather, extreme temperatures, decrease in water availability and changes in soil. These factors can affect a plant’s growth. The stressors of a plant are abiotic stress and biotic stress. In order for a plant to grow it needs sunlight, water, and air. Sunlight is how a plant get its food through a process called photosynthesis. Water is the most important factor in what a plant needs to grow. A plant also needs nutrients to grow healthy. 

Alejandro C.
said

My name is Alejandro. I'm a senior at Watsonville High, and my favorite classes are science, math, and history. In my free time I enjoy playing sports, reading, and being outdoors.

Jessica Nicole Sweet
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Alejandro C.
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Julie P.
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hi! my name is julie and im 17 years old and a senior at watsonville high and i dont have a favorite class but on my free time i like to exercise

Julie P.
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PlantingScience Staff
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Brenda L.
said

Hi! My name is Brenda. I am a senior at Watsonville High School. I don't have a favorite class. In my free time, I like to hangout with friends and listen to music.  

Brenda L.
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Nadia A.
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Hi, my name is Nadia. i am 17 years old, i am a senior at Watsonville high school. i was born in Mexico but raised here in Watsonville my whole life. I am a visual learner , i think when seeing things in action help me learn faster. one of my favorite subject has to be anything that has to do anything science.

    Lydia Tressel
    said

    Hello Nadia! It is very nice to meet you! It is so great that you enjoy science so much! I am looking forward to seeing how your project turns out!

    Lydia

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PlantingScience Staff
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Welcome to your PlantingScience project page!

Welcome to this community of plant researchers. As your team plans and conducts your own research project, you will be mentored by a scientist. The mentor's role is to encourage and guide you through the process of scientific discovery. The more you share your ideas and research information online, the more your mentor can help. You can also find out more about your mentor. What is their research about? Why did they go into science? What do they like to do when they are not working?

You may also hear from this classroom’s assigned scientist liaison. Liaisons work with several mentors and help make sure the conversations are going strong. They may also offer some extra advice or encouragement.

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