some humans

Project by group lsasfall2020

Info

Explore Explore Section: Plant Cells: Plant cells are eukaryotic. Eukaryotic cells have multiple chromosomes. Some Eukaryotic cells have a couple chromosomes, while some Eukaryotic cells have more than 100 chromosomes. All these chromosomes are protected by a nucleus. Eukaryotic cells also contain...
Research Question Experiment 1: Question: Can we see how fast different liquids travel up the stem of celery (capillary action and transpiration)? Purpose: To figure out if the xylem transport different liquids- It if does, I think they will be transported more slowly because the celery isn’t used to them....
Predictions 1- We predict the liquid movement will stop because of the carbonation in the Coke. We think the lemonade will start making its way to the top then stop on its way up because it will accept the sugar at 1st but then reject it. Then, it won’t keep going up because of the sugar in the water....
Experimental Design de from sugar, water and lemon juice. (add black dye) Fill cup with coke and water, and put dye in each flask (same amount of dye) Cut celery length so it is the same Put celery in each flask Come back at the end of Block (1 hour later) and take 1 piece of celery out. Then measure how...
Conclusion Experiment 1: In conclusion, we have realized that celery doesn’t seem to take in anything other than water. The coke and lemonade went up about ¼cm before not going up further. Even though it didn’t take in the other liquids, they still didn’t alter the physical celery as much as the salt water...

Updates

Get to know your team’s scientist mentor, who will encourage and guide you through the scientific process of discovery. The more you share your ideas and research info, the more your mentor can help. You may also hear from a scientist mentor liaison who will be helping all the teams in your class.
PlantingScience Staff
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Yasmine
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Yasmine
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PlantingScience Staff
said

Farewell and Best Wishes

As this research project is now in the final stages of wrapping-up, we wish to thank everyone who participated in this inquiry; the students, mentors, teachers and others behind the scenes. We appreciate all of your efforts and contributions to this online learning community.

Scientific exploration is a process of discovery that can be fun! There are many unanswered questions about plants just waiting for new scientists to consider, investigate, and share.

After the end of the session, we will be updating the platform and archiving groups and projects, after which time new updates/posts will not be able to be added to projects or groups. Please come back and visit the PlantingScience Project Gallery anytime to view this project in the future. You can search the Gallery by keyword, team name, topic, or school name.

Good bye for now.

Warm regards,

The PlantingScience Team

Catherine Vrentas
said

Hi team,

Thank you so much for your kind note. I also apologize for being unreliable with the Zoom connections--we have had some sickness at work this week and I have been dealing with this problem but I feel very fortunate to have worked with you this semester!  I wanted to make sure you knew how impressive I thought your work was on this project--I really enjoyed your photos and sketches that enhanced your work. You also demonstrated strong scientific thinking skills. I hope that you and all your friends and family are safe and happy as we move into this Thanksgiving season and that the rest of your semester goes smoothly.  Your team really stands out in terms of your diligence and creativity in your project!

Yasmine
said

Thank you Dr. Vrentas!

    We really appreciated working with you! All your advice was really helpful and we enjoyed it greatly. One of our favorite parts of our experiment was examining the celery and making observations. 

Thank you! -Some Humans (Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella) 

Catherine Vrentas
said

Hi team!

I understand you are coming to the end of your journey with your project, and I will be planning on attending for the presentation on Friday.

I went through your poster content again and I had a few quick notes related to your presentation--just some things to think about as you describe your results, extending from our discussion:

--Based on what we discussed about salt water, how might we be able to explain the celery getting flaccid in that condition?

--How might this experiment relate to the water the plant is taking up in the ground? (in other words, what might be in that water?)

Nice work everyone!  I hope these comments will help you to clarify things.  Good luck on your presentations on Wednesday.

Sincerely,

Cathy

Yasmine
said

Hi Dr. Vrentas! 

     Thank you for taking the time and meeting with us, we really appreciate it! I just put our poster in the files section if you would like to take a look. We have fixed our poster based on the suggestions. Thanks for the recap on everything we talked about. If you have any other questions or suggestions we would love to hear them. 

Thank you! 

-Some Humans (Yasmine, Stella and Jacob) 

Yasmine
uploaded Capillary Action Experiment poster .pdf in project files
Catherine Vrentas
said

Hi team,

It was great to speak with you on Wednesday!  I am glad we were able to connect on Zoom and I hope you have had a good week at school.

As a recap, we discussed a few things about your slides:

--The fact that mushy stems could be some bacterial growth over a couple of days, and that the bluish/greenish color was still probably the food dye

--The process of osmosis--water can flow out of cells to create a balance when the water around the cells is very salty.  This means that the cells will shrivel up, and the celery will become "wilty."

--Water in the soil may have some other chemicals, like minerals (like our electrolyte water!) dissolved in it.  Water with other dissolved chemicals can still move into the plant.  But it can be complex, since there is a balance of water flows in and out of cells!

--The plant will need water for its cells, so that it can stand up straight and also because water is needed for the chemistry of life.  The plant gets energy from a different source--it captures the energy from light in sugars through photosynthesis, and then the sugars are broken down in the plant cells through respiration to provide the plant with energy.

I know you were mentioning at the end that you might need some additional feedback--was it on the poster or the slides?  I just wanted to check to make sure I was looking at the right place and answering the remaining questions that you had :)

Sincerely,

Cathy

PlantingScience Staff
said

Looks like you are in the final stages of your projects.

It’s great to see that teams from your school are wrapping up and posting conclusions. Enjoy the final stages of your project, and feel free to post any final comments or questions you have for your mentors.

Yasmine
said

Hi Dr. Vrentas! 

All good, excited to meet with you on Wednesday! We wanted to update you on some of our information for our poster. We have concluded both our experiments with the celery too. I have put our google slides presentation in the files section if you would like to look at it.

-Some Humans (Yasmine, Jacob and Stella) 

    Catherine Vrentas
    said

    Thank you! I will look over this before we meet today :)

Yasmine
updated Celery Science Experiment Organization.pdf in project files
Catherine Vrentas
said

Hi team!

I have been having some issues with getting the forum messages due to some of my messages going to spam, so I know I missed out on the opportunity to chat on Zoom last week.  I apologize for this!! (Just to clarify--it is nothing wrong with the Planting Science portal, which is great--but my email).

So I wanted to make sure we had a chance to "meet" on video and so I made a video that talks about my background as a scientist and some of the things I like most about being a scientist.  I hope it will be helpful to you--I wanted you to know that I have really enjoyed being your mentor this semester, that it is important to me, and that I want to make sure you have a chance to get as much as possible out of this experience!

**To find the file--you can go under the Files tab to the left and it is the new video.  (I actually split it into three, to make sure it uploaded with the size.).  If there are any problems with the video opening, I will work on sharing it in a different way that is consistent with the Planting Science rules.

I hope you had a fun Halloween!  Did you have a costume?  I must say I was pretty boring (no costume for me) but I saw some really cool plant-related costumes online.  My favorite was someone who dressed up as a slug. Garden slugs can certainly cause havoc among vegetables...

 

Please feel free to let me know what questions you have.

 

Sincerely,

Cathy

Catherine Vrentas
uploaded Cathy--Planting Science Video-First part.m4v in project files
Catherine Vrentas
uploaded Cathy--Planting Science Video-Part 2.m4v in project files
Yasmine
said

Happy Halloween! 

     We wanted to let you know that we have concluded our experiment. We will upload the slides with all of our information. Some of the results we got were very interesting. I will upload the some pictures too. We will have a draft of the poster we are making soon. 

-Some Humans (Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella) 

    Catherine Vrentas
    said

    Hi team,

    That is great news!  I will look over this tomorrow (Monday) AM and share some notes.

    Sincerely,

    Cathy

Yasmine
uploaded Celery Science Experiment Organization.pdf in project files
Yasmine
uploaded IMG_1798.HEIC and 2 more files in project files
Catherine Vrentas
said

Hi team,

Some more great data and pictures/drawings as well!  I really enjoy all of the information you have recorded.  I personally find that having graphics in scientific papers is very helpful in terms of helping me understand what the other scientists have done, just like you have depicted your different cups with celery. Another thing I like here is how you have noted the variables you have kept constant across the experiment, in order to control sources of variation as best as possible.

Keep up the good work!

Sincerely,

Cathy

 

 

Yasmine
uploaded DifferentWaterEP.jpg in project files
Yasmine
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Yasmine
said

Thanks Dr. Vrentas,

     Those are some great observations. We watched the video and that does a great job representing how celery shrivels when it lets go of water. To answer your questions, I don't think the same thing happened in the other liquids but I do think something similar happened. I believe that since the celery blocked out the coke all together that it wasn't actually losing water. But since not getting water is similar to losing water due to transpiration it probably would have started drooping more  significantly if we gave it enough time.

We will also be doing another experiment on celery in different types of water. 

--Some Humans (Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella) :)

Catherine Vrentas
said

Hi team,

Looks like you have been hard at work--I am impressed!

I still owe you a good video with xylem and phloem...I am looking and I will let you know when I find one I like!

In terms of your data, one thing I am noticing as a trend is the liquids that had sugar in them (coke, lemonade) showed drooping and poor water transport...and only the water container had good water transport.  This reminds me of your salt water data from before, where you saw the celery becoming droopy.  I found a nice video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLhIpjsZIaw

Do you think that the same process that is happening with the salt water could be happening with the sugary beverages?  What might be the same between both the salt water and the beverages?

Keep up the good work!

Sincerely,

Cathy

Yasmine
said

Thanks Dr. Vrentas! 

     We have been busy planning and executing our experiment. We just finished now with lots of notes and observations. We put 3 celery sticks in each cup (coke, lemonade, and water). Some observations we made were: 

Coke 1. it didn't travel farther than 1/4 cm. 2. Vascular tissue was normal passed the black bottom 3. Flaccid 4. brown spots on the outside 5. Kept soaking in the ground tissue but not in the vascular tissue 

Lemonade 1. Very black on the bottom 2. No signs of black if you cut through the middle 3. Soft and bendy 4. Regular white on the inside 5. Clear at the bottom other than the xylem tissues 

Water with dye 1. Random spots of color in xylem tissues 2. lots of color in the xylem tissues 3. Turgid 4. Darker around the edges 5. Went up in less than and 1hour and 20 min. 

Our conclusion was that celery doesn't seem to take in anything other than water. Since coming to this conclusion, we have a few thoughts for the future. What would happen if we tried putting celery in different variations of water? Would it go up the vascular tubes? We could use waters like sparkling water of lemon water. 

We look forward to your thoughts, Some Humans (Yasmine, Stella, and Jacob)

*We averaged about an hour and twenty minutes between each look at the celery . The food dye was black and in each cup*

 

Julie Sohl
uploaded SomeHumans.jpg in project files
Yasmine
said

Thank you Dr.Vrentas! Stella is happy that you liked the drawings :). I didn't know that you couldn't post pictures, so Dr. Sohl helped me upload it to files. Sorry for any inconvenience. 

--Yes, we will have food dye in everything, just to keep it constant. It will also be in the control so we can compare results.

--To answer your second question, we will be getting celery that looks about the same. We will then be cutting it for the height to be the same (10cm). We can't control the width and mass so we will just measure those changes from the start. 

--We think that the orange juice since it is water, sugar, and citrus (essentially) it might clog and/or overload the xylem and phloem vascular tubes. We think this because xylem takes water and phloem takes sugar. We don't know how it will react to both in one liquid. Will it separate them? Or just reject it altogether? 

Sincerely, 

Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella :)

    Catherine Vrentas
    said

    Hi team,

    No worries--no inconvenience!  I just wanted to make sure I didn't miss anything :)

    That sounds like a good idea to include food dye in each of the cups.  I also like your plan to cut and select the celery so that it is as similar as possible in each cup.  I 100% agree--you will not be able to perfectly control those variables, so you are doing the best that you can to make them as similar as possible between conditions.  This is often true in science--we do the best we can to control variables, but especially in ecology experiments (where we might be assessing information from different parts of the land outside), it may not be possible to control things 100%.

    I like how you are thinking through the xylem and the phloem and how this might influence transport.  It is a complex concept!  I am going to find a few pictures that I think might be useful in thinking this through and post them to this board tomorrow.

    Again, great work--I'll be in touch with some more information, and I am looking forward to seeing your next updates on your experiment.

     

    Sincerely,

    Cathy

Yasmine
said

Thank you Dr.Vrentas! Stella is happy that you liked the drawings :). I didn't know that you couldn't post pictures, so Dr. Sohl helped me upload it to files. Sorry for any inconvenience. 

--Yes, we will have food dye in everything, just to keep it constant. It will also be in the control so we can compare results.

--To answer your second question, we will be getting celery that looks about the same. We will then be cutting it for the height to be the same (10cm). We can't control the width and mass so we will just measure those changes from the start. 

--We think that the orange juice since it is water, sugar, and citrus (essentially) it might clog and/or overload the xylem and phloem vascular tubes. We think this because xylem takes water and phloem takes sugar. We don't know how it will react to both in one liquid. Will it separate them? Or just reject it altogether? 

Sincerely, 

Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella :)

Yasmine
said

Thank you Dr.Vrentas! Stella is happy that you liked the drawings :). I didn't know that you couldn't post pictures, so Dr. Sohl helped me upload it to files. Sorry for any inconvenience. 

--Yes, we will have food dye in everything, just to keep it constant. It will also be in the control so we can compare results.

--To answer your second question, we will be getting celery that looks about the same. We will then be cutting it for the height to be the same (10cm). We can't control the width and mass so we will just measure those changes from the start. 

--We think that the orange juice since it is water, sugar, and citrus (essentially) it might clog and/or overload the xylem and phloem vascular tubes. We think this because xylem takes water and phloem takes sugar. We don't know how it will react to both in one liquid. Will it separate them? Or just reject it altogether? 

Sincerely, 

Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella :)

Yasmine
said

Thank you Dr.Vrentas! Stella is happy that you liked the drawings :). I didn't know that you couldn't post pictures, so Dr. Sohl helped me upload it to files. Sorry for any inconvenience. 

--Yes, we will have food dye in everything, just to keep it constant. It will also be in the control so we can compare results.

--To answer your second question, we will be getting celery that looks about the same. We will then be cutting it for the height to be the same (10cm). We can't control the width and mass so we will just measure those changes from the start. 

--We think that the orange juice since it is water, sugar, and citrus (essentially) it might clog and/or overload the xylem and phloem vascular tubes. We think this because xylem takes water and phloem takes sugar. We don't know how it will react to both in one liquid. Will it separate them? Or just reject it altogether? 

Sincerely, 

Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella :)

Yasmine
said

Thank you Dr.Vrentas! Stella is happy that you liked the drawings :). I didn't know that you couldn't post pictures, so Dr. Sohl helped me upload it to files. Sorry for any inconvenience. 

--Yes, we will have food dye in everything, just to keep it constant. It will also be in the control so we can compare results.

--To answer your second question, we will be getting celery that looks about the same. We will then be cutting it for the height to be the same (10cm). We can't control the width and mass so we will just measure those changes from the start. 

--We think that the orange juice since it is water, sugar, and citrus (essentially) it might clog and/or overload the xylem and phloem vascular tubes. We think this because xylem takes water and phloem takes sugar. We don't know how it will react to both in one liquid. Will it separate them? Or just reject it altogether? 

Sincerely, 

Yasmine, Jacob, and Stella :)

Yasmine
uploaded Experiment- Measuring Transpiration .jpg in project files
    Catherine Vrentas
    said

    Hi team!  I am not sure if I missed something with the previous post--I wasn't sure if I should see a photo or a diagram.  But now I see the image from yesterday's post!  If I am missing a link or a document, just let me know.

    I love how you have sketched this out with diagrams.  It makes it very easy to understand the experiment.  I also enjoyed the sketch of each of you in the corner :)

    I had a couple of questions:

    --It sounds like (from the list of constants above) that all of the liquids will have food dye--do I have that right?

    --Do you think the characteristics of the celery stalks selected for use in the different cups may be different across stalks? What might you be able to do to help keep this constant?

    --What do you think might be different about the orange juice--in other words, what might be different about the orange juice such that it is moving through the stem differently than plain water?

    Looking forward to hearing your ideas!

    Sincerely,

    Cathy

     

     

Yasmine
said

Yasmine
said

Hi Dr.Vrentas! Thank you for the feedback. We have planned out our experiment. Please tell us what you think. 

-Some Humans 

PlantingScience Staff
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    Catherine Vrentas
    said

    Hi team,

    It sounds like you are on the right track here!  Drooping plants have indeed lost water. So something to think about is how all of these elements connect:

    --Salt makes the celery lose mass

    --Salt makes the celery droop

    --Drooping means the celery has lost water

    All of this is consistent with the idea, like you suggest, that the celery loses water in the presence of the salt.

    I think that your experimental idea is quite interesting! I like how you have thought about what your variables will be, and how you will be able to tell how far the water has moved. One thing you might want to consider is also comparing two separate setups.  For example--one cup could have warm water and one could have cold water.  You could then make a line graph for each cup and see if there is a difference.  That is just one idea--I am sure you can come up with lots of more creative ideas!

    One question to think about--do you think that any properties of the celery itself could change how quickly the water moves? For example--the size of the stalk, the age of the celery, etc.

    I think you are doing a great job!  Looking forward to hearing more.

    Sincerely,

    Cathy

Jacob
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Yasmine
said

Hi Dr.Vrentas! We have updated our explore section if you would like to check it out.  

-Some humans, Yasmine, Stella, and Jacob 

Yasmine
said

Hello! For the first question, the celery is almost fully submerged in the cup of water when we put it in, when we took it out, they had shrunk to be fully submerged. The different types of variables we measured were height, mass, and salinity. We recorded lots of information for the salt water cups, like how it felt softer, how soggy and bendy it got in the salt water which we identified as flaccid, and the orange dots Jacob found on the cross-section. We also noticed in the regular water, the celery was turgid and did not change in height though it did change a little in mass. We also measured how much the celery shrunk in the different waters. We realized while recording that the celery in the salt water shrunk, and he control didn't shrink at all. We finished the experiment, but our hypothesizes were that the celery might die because of the salt in the water. Our other hypothesis is that the salt might clog the vascular tissue (phloem and xylem passageways).  

Sincerely, Some Humans- Yasmine, Jacob and Stella 

    Catherine Vrentas
    said

    Hi team!

      You did a great job with the update!  I also like how you presented multiple hypotheses for what might be happening with your celery, and how you are thinking about some of the parts of a celery stalk--such as xylem and phloem--to come up with your ideas.

    It sounds like you have collected multiple types of information about your celery stalks that will help us to understand our results:

    --The salt water made the celery "bendy" and caused the celery to shrink

    --The fresh water kept the celery crisp

    I had a few questions for you to think about; feel free to respond back here:

    --You mentioned that the celery that was placed in the regular water changed in mass.  Did it increase or decrease?  Based on that--what do you think could be happening inside the celery to cause it to change in mass?  For example, if it increased in mass, what is being added to the celery stalk to cause to increase?

    --How about the celery stalk in the salt water--did it change in mass too?  If so, did it increase or decrease?

    --Have you ever gone outside and saw a plant that was bending over or droopy?  Why does that happen and what could you do to "fix" it?

    --What questions do you have about your experiment?  Is there any information you feel like you would need to collect/read about to help you to understand what might be happening?

    Again, great work!  Looking forward to hearing more about your thoughts and ideas :)

     

     

Stella
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