Crazy Coconuts :)

Project by group nebuzzellspring2017

Info

Explore We know that plants need certain things to survive ( water, sunlight etc.). We also know that different plants have different time-frames on how long it takes to grow. In class, we learned what agronomy is and we learned the correct pH level for plants. We also learned that if the weather is...
Research Question We want to study the affect of different soil temperatures on plant growth. We came up with this question because we were wondering how different plants grow in different soil temperatures. The soil temperatures will represent different climates and how the temperature in those climates affect...
Predictions A possible outcome is that the cooler weather will slow down plant growth because the plant doesn't thrive in temperatures other than what it is used to. We think the warm weather will dry the plant out because the warm temperature will take the moisture out of the plant.
Experimental Design Supplies: -12 plastic cups - 24 radish seeds 2 in each cup - 3 thermometers - soil filled to the first line in the plastic cup - 25 ml of water every other day per cup - 1 light bulb First, we set up one light bulb underneath the container.( see updates page to see how we set up...
Conclusion The warm bin pants grew heather and taller than the cold and controlled bins. One explanation is that the moister from the cap being on the warm bin ( acting like a greenhouse) made the plants more damp helping them grow at a faster rate and making them stronger. An explanation for the cold bin...

Updates

Get to know your team’s scientist mentor, who will encourage and guide you through the scientific process of discovery. The more you share your ideas and research info, the more your mentor can help. You may also hear from a scientist mentor liaison who will be helping all the teams in your class.
PlantingScience Staff
has been updated by administrator
michayla
updated the project info
michayla
said

Hi Steven

I just wanted to let you know that I have attached our journals and power point to the files page. 

-Michayla 

michayla
said

Hi Steven

I just wanted to let you know that I have attached our journals and power point to the files page. 

-Michayla 

michayla
uploaded The Effects of Temperature on Plant Growth.pptx in project files
michayla
uploaded PlantingScienceJournal-Emmie.pdf in project files
michayla
uploaded PlantingScienceJournal-Michael.pdf in project files
michayla
uploaded PlantingScienceJournal-Michayla.pdf in project files
Steven Thomas Callen
said

It's been great working with you, Crazy Coconuts. I was excited each day in anticipation of your posts, and I was pleased that you were able to be creative about your projects.

I thought that your results were very interesting, although you didn't draw very many conclusions about the weight of the plants, only growth. As silly as this sounds, if I were a radish farmer, I would want radishes, and the bigger the better, and I'd care less about the above ground biomass. While you didn't have enough time for radishes to develop fully, I wonder if your weight data, where the control weighed more than both experimental groups, suggest that these control conditions would produce bigger radishes. It would be something to possibly test in the future.

I hope you all maintain your excitement and enthusiasm for science! Keep up the good work!

Steven

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    Also, if you have a PowerPoint presentation, please upload it so I can see how cool it was!

emilia
said

Steven

This session of planting science has been such a great learning experience. We would have hoped for better results but that is just what happens in an experiment. We all greatly appreciate the help and encouragement that you gave us and our project. In the end we could not have had a better more helpful mentor. 

Thank you,

Michael, Michayla, and Emmie 

emilia
said

Steven

This session of planting science has been such a great learning experience. We would have hoped for better results but that is just what happens in an experiment. We all greatly appreciate the help and encouragement that you gave us and our project. In the end we could not have had a better more helpful mentor. 

Thank you,

Michael, Michayla, and Emmie 

emilia
said

Steven

This session of planting science has been such a great learning experience. We would have hoped for better results but that is just what happens in an experiment. We all greatly appreciate the help and encouragement that you gave us and our project. In the end we could not have had a better more helpful mentor. 

Thank you,

Michael, Michayla, and Emmie 

Rebecca Buzzell
said

Hi Team,

As we are finishing up, please make sure that each team member has updated and uploaded their journal, and that you have posted a short summary of your conclusion and how it relates to agronomy, and then upload your final presentation (ppt) - you should be completely done by Tuesday. Make sure you thank your mentor, too!

Rebecca Buzzell
said

Michayla,

I saw your post - the radishes did grow, but yours had not developed enough to be recognizable as radishes - they were still pretty young. They would have to grow longer in order to develop fully. 

Steven Thomas Callen
said

Thanks for keeping me updated and letting me know you are finished with the experimental part of your project (and will be on vacay next week).

I noticed that you suggest in your conclusions that the warmer plants "grew healthier and taller," but is this statement actually reflected in your data? I agree that the cold plants performed less well than both, but, with the exception of the final 2 days, the control plants were taller (but not by much). Also, you noted that the control plants were much heavier than the heat/cold treated plants. Does this suggest that heat or cold was beneficial or not to the plants?

If you were to change your conclusions based on your presented evidence, what would you say?

michayla
said

Hi Steven, 

We have vacation all of next week. Just wanted to let you know because we will not be working on our project during this time.

Thanks, 

Michayla 

PlantingScience Staff
said

Looks like you are in the final stages of your projects
It’s great to see that teams from your school are wrapping up and posting conclusions. Enjoy the final stages of your project, and feel free to post any final comments or questions you have for your mentors. 

Farewell and Best Wishes
As this research project is now in the final stages of wrapping-up, we wish to thank everyone who participated in this inquiry; the students, mentors, teachers and others behind the scenes. We appreciate all of your efforts and contributions to this online learning community. 

Scientific exploration is a process of discovery that can be fun! There are many unanswered questions about plants just waiting for new scientists to consider, investigate, and share. 

Please come back and visit the PlantingScience Research Gallery Archive anytime (Found under Community>Projects) to view this project in the future. You can search the Archive by key word, team name, topic, or school name.

Good bye for now. 
Warm regards,
The PlantingScience team

michayla
uploaded graph.jpg in project files
michayla
said

Hi steven 

Today we dumped out our plants, unfortunately we had no radishes growing. We weighed the plants and the warm was 0.3 grams, Cold 0.2 grams, and controlled 1.6 grams. 

Steven Thomas Callen
said

Glad to hear things are starting to wrap up for you. Thanks for sharing your data and figure with me. What does your graph tell you about your plants and treatments? It seems unusual to me that height decreases... I assume this doesn't mean that somehow your plants actually got smaller! Is this an effect of your plants dying or lodging too much?

michael
uploaded graph.pdf in project files
michayla
said

Hi steven, 

Today is the last day of measuring. However, this will not be the last day of the whole thing.  

michayla
said

Hi steven, 

Today is the last day of measuring. However, this will not be the last day of the whole thing.  

michael
said

Steven

Today we will update our journals as we do every Friday. Next week however is the last week of our project, so our conclusions will soon be written. At the moment we have been struggling to keep some of our plants alive. The nitrogen rich soil has caused them to grow up to 15cm tall, but due to this some stems have bent over the weight on the pants tiny stems. i think that one way we could straighten the plants would be to ask our teacher if she has any little straws that we could cut up and put around the plants stems. over the weekend the plants should end up watering themselves as they had the past two weekends so we are not completely concerned with watering them today. Hopefully all goes smoothly,

Michael

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    This characteristic that you observed with the plants falling over is called "lodging," and can be quite common. In fact, some of the varieties of quinoa plants we grow exhibit this behavior under certain circumstances. As you mentioned, it can be caused by high nitrogen levels, but also by wet soils, storm damage, soil density, disease, sowing date, overpopulation, and seed type. This is one of the "tests" a crop must undergo before it is deemed suitable for planting. Obviously, farmers don't want a plant, especially corn, to fall over to the ground, as it may prevent them from harvesting them or may increase the chances of disease and damage.

    And, yep, I wouldn't worry about giving the plants water for the weekend. Seems like they have been doing pretty well on their own.

    Excellent work on this project, team! I can't wait to see your final report. You all have demonstrated an excellent degree of inquisitiveness, excitement, and creativity on this project, all of which are great qualities of scientists!

michael
uploaded PlantingScienceJournal-Michael 1.pdf in project files
Steven Thomas Callen
said

I'm glad to hear things are moving forward! It looks like you are seeing above-ground differences among your treatments, though perhaps not too much between the control and warm bin. Do you know how much longer you will monitor your plants before you pull them out and weigh them/look at their roots? I am curious to see if the roots actually develop into what we know radishes look like. If they do develop, you may consider measuring the size of the radishes... perhaps take a string, loop it around the widest part of the radish, and then measure the length of the string. Just another suggestion.

I was also elated to hear of each of your interests. The common theme among them for me was that you all understand and are interested in the idea that plants are living organisms that respond to differences in their environments just like animals do (it's just that plants don't move... which actually creates a special problem for plants - for example, they don't go from one place to another to find good temperatures for growth and development)! 

michael
uploaded IMG_0065.JPG in project files
michael
uploaded IMG_0063.JPG in project files
michael
uploaded IMG_0062.JPG in project files
emilia
said

Steven,

Today we did the normal stuff. We measured, watered, and got the temps.

Soil temperatures:

Cool soil- 23.3 degrees celsius

Normal/ controlled- 26.1 degrees celsius

Warm soil- 30.9 degrees celsius

The reason the plants were a little warmer was because the ice packs melted, and it was very warm out the past 2 days.

Hope to hear from you soon,

Crazy Coconuts 

michael
uploaded PlantingScienceJournal-Michael.pdf in project files
emilia
said

Steven,

This project is very interesting to me. I think that what interests me most is learning what different plants need to live and be healthy. Since I want to be some form of scientist when I grow up, the whole experiment is pretty exciting to me.

Emmie

michael
said

Steven,

Thanks, we ave been rolling smoothly since the watering problem cane to a conclusion. I'm not sure if anyone has told you yet but we are only going to water our plants when they have to be watered from now on. 

Right now I am most interested in why our plants are growing so so tall. The warm and controlled bin are over 10 cm! After all this is not normal fr radish plants. When I took research on why this was happening, I found out that the soil we are using is super rich in nitrogen. When plants get to much nitrogen they tend to grow tall  and are more open to infections. See you on Monday.

Michael

michayla
said

Hi steven its Michayla 

I am interested in the cold bin. It is pretty common that the warm and controlled bin would grow, but i didn't think that the cold bin would grow at all and it did! Lately the cold bin hasn't been very cold. Do you have any suggestions on how to make it colder? 

emilia
said

Steven, 

Today the temperatures were closer than usual.  

Control- 20.6 degrees Celsius

Warm- 23.3 degrees Celsius

Cold- 17.3 degrees Celsius

It may be due to the fact that the light bulb for the warm bin went out, but it was replaced. We got more snow for the cold bin also.

To answer your question, we do think that we could weigh the plants in the end.

- Emmie 

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    That's no problem. What we hope is that over the course of the whole experiment the temperatures are overall different from each other.

    I'd like to hear what each of you is enjoying most so far about the project. What has interested you the most or made you excited?

michael
uploaded IMG_0061.JPG in project files
michael
uploaded IMG_0059.JPG in project files
michael
uploaded IMG_0058.JPG in project files
michayla
said

Hi Steven!

There is a difference in the warm and room temperature bin, the difference in temperatures is one. Another thing is there seems to be more growth in the warm bin.We are not yet sure when we will be ending the project

- Michayla

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    It's good that the temperatures are different, but I am particularly interested to know if there are differences in the plant's reaction to those different temps. After looking at Michael's report, it does look like the warm plants germinated and started growing sooner than the control, although they seem to have caught up since then.

    Continue to collect your data and look at it for patterns as you do. There's no detail too small! Have you decided if you will be able to weigh your plants at the end?

michael
updated the project info
michael
uploaded PlantingScienceJournal-MichaelRobinson.pdf in project files
michael
said

Turns out our plants absorbed a lot of moisture from their bins over the weekend. When we watered them they were super soggy, and were in a pool of water. Due to this we decided to drain the plants so that they do not drown. The cold bin temperature went up over the weekend, but that is to be expected because the ice packs melted. We finally gt a sprout in our cold bin, and the other bin's plants are climbing up to nearly three inches tall. Just keeping you updated.

Michael

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    Thanks for the update, Michael! Experiments don't always go as planned, but I am glad to see that you were able to think quickly and drained all that excess water from the plants.

    Do you notice any difference between the warm and the room temp bin? How long will you continue to observe your plants and collect your data?

    Thanks for keeping me updated!

michayla
said

Hi

We have been collecting the temperatures and the average height in each bin. We have no plants in the cold bin. Today the temperature in the cold bin has almost doubled in temperature.yesterday it was 9.9 degrees celsius and today it is 16.2 is that ok? 

Michayla 

 

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    Yes, it's OK if the temperatures in the bins vary, so long as the cold bin is colder than the control bin overall.

emilia
said

Steven, 

Today we have sprouts in the controlled bin and the warm bin. The temperatures in the soil were 9.9 degrees celsius (Cold), 21.3 degrees celsius for the normal one, and 33.6 degrees celsius for the warm one. We are rotating the cups so that they get equal amounts of light.  Thank you for your opinions,

Emmie

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    That's great that there is such a wide temperature difference. No sprouts yet in the cold bin? Have you started to collect some data? What data are you collecting?

michael
uploaded IMG_0054.JPG in project files
michael
uploaded IMG_0055.JPG in project files
michael
uploaded IMG_0056.JPG in project files
Steven Thomas Callen
said

You may also want to consider rotating your cups each day. Based on your photo, it looks like the light source is more under one area than another. This could mean that the soil directly above the light gets hotter than the soil farther away. Be consistent where you are measuring soil temperature (may not be in the same cup if you rotate them, but should measure in the same spot within the bin, e.g. the soil over the light).

michael
said

However, because of the light source so close to our plants, the light will have to be shut off more often. This means at night, possibly short periods during the day, and weekends. (The weekends one would have to happen anyways... fire hazard.) Still this should increase soil temperature more rapidly.

Michael

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    Yes, this is not problem. The heat should be trapped in the soil for longer than it stays in the air anyway. With your thermometers, are you sticking them in the soil to measure soil temp or inside the side of the box to measure air temp? I recommend sticking them in the soil if you can.

    Plus, this makes it a little more realistic! Once the sun goes down, temperatures cool off over night, just like what will happen here. And I understand the reason for not having them on over the weekend... there's just no way around this and you have to work with what you can.

michayla
said

Hi Steven. 

I know the main focus for our project is seeing how the soil temperature effects plant growth. When we see the end result should we do the average temperature for the whole project in each bin.

Thanks Michayla. 

 

    Steven Thomas Callen
    said

    Yes, you can just report the mean temperatures over the days. In my mind, you could do a simple statistical test called a t-test to compare the temperatures to see if they are significantly different. Statistics may be too far to go with this project, but if you want me to do it for you, just give me the data! 

    How often are you recording the temps? Once per day? How many weeks?