Scientific Smarties

Project by group dmsgrayfall2019

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Explore We know that plants go through photosynthesis, plants need sunlight, food, and water, they are grown with all different types of seed, they have to germinate. Seedlings can become plants, flowers, and so much more. The seeds and the plants can come in all shapes in sizes. We were wondering what...
Research Question How does the temperature of the water affect the growth of the buckwheat plant? We already know that the plants need a medium temperature of water to grow and become a plant. We also know that if we make our water too hot it might burn the seed and then it won't be able to sprout.
Predictions If the water temperature is warmer then, the height of the buckwheat plant will be taller. This is because plants that are watered with warmer water germinate faster than plants watered with colder water. Also buckwheat is a plant that is grown during the spring so it is typically watered with a...
Experimental Design We are going to have 5 petri dishes with 5 buckwheat seeds in them. We will put 1 ml of ice cold water in one dish, 1 ml of cold water in 1 dish, 1 ml of room temperature water in 1 dish, 1 ml of hot water in 1 dish, and 1 ml of really hot water in the last petri dish. We are going to put the 2...
Conclusion The warmer the water temperature, the taller the plant will grow. We found this out because the seeds that were watered with very hot, hot, and room temperature water grew the tallest. This happened because buckwheat is grown durring the late spring to early summer so the seeds need warmer water...
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PlantingScience Staff
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PlantingScience Staff
said
Farewell and Best Wishes
As this research project is now in the final stages of wrapping-up, we wish to thank everyone who participated in this inquiry; the students, mentors, teachers and others behind the scenes. We appreciate all of your efforts and contributions to this online learning community.

Scientific exploration is a process of discovery that can be fun! There are many unanswered questions about plants just waiting for new scientists to consider, investigate, and share.

After the end of the session, we will be updating the platform and archiving groups and projects, after which time new updates/posts will not be able to be added to projects or groups. Please come back and visit the PlantingScience Project Gallery anytime to view this project in the future. You can search the Gallery by keyword, team name, topic, or school name.

Good bye for now.
Warm regards,
The PlantingScience team
PlantingScience Staff
said
Looks like you are in the final stages of your projects.
It’s great to see that teams from your school are wrapping up and posting conclusions. Enjoy the final stages of your project, and feel free to post any final comments or questions you have for your mentors.
Allee S
said

Thank you so much for your time and help on our experiment! We had a lot of fun doing this and growing our seeds with you. :)

Sydney & Allee

    Kaushal Kumar Bhati
    said

    Thank you Sydney and Allee for participation. Kudoes to your wonderful teacher Evelyn. I wish you very best in studies.

Elle S
said

Elle S
said

Thank you for your time and expertise. Bye!

Allee S
said

Great! Thank you.

 

Allee S
said

Do you think a line graph was the best choice?

    Kaushal Kumar Bhati
    said

    Hi Allee, 

    Your choice of graph is right. Generally, the data structure determines what kind of graph one should use. In your experiment, if you have more replicates per treatment best choice would have been box plot graph. 

Allee S
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Allee S
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Allee S
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Allee S
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Allee S
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Allee S
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Elle S
said

Yes, we realized that after we made the graph.

Allee S
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    Kaushal Kumar Bhati
    said

    Good job everyone, this graph is looking very convincing, do you know,  using bar graphs you can also indicate on graph how significant your results are.  

Allee S
said

Based on our results, we believe that the cold water is the temperature that caused our seeds not to sprout as well as the other ones. The seeds with room temperature water were the most successful, because we think that room temperature water is what seeds are the most used to. The seeds with hot water also did pretty well. All of the seeds with very hot, hot, and room temperature water all sprouted. The seeds with cold and very cold water only 2-3 seeds sprouted. That is the answer to our investigation question.

Allee S
said

Yes, today is our last day and the roots are very long. They haven't sprouted leaves yet though. The seeds that were watered with the hot water were the most successful.

Kaushal Kumar Bhati
said

Hi Guys,

Have you already started seeing germination? It is an interesting stage to look how different root origin/structure are among different plants (corn and buckwheat in your case). 

Allee S
said

This is our setup for the seeds!

Allee S
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Allee S
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Allee S
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said

Hello, guys! How are you doing?

Do you guys have your experiment running yet? Keep me posted!

Aline

Allee S
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