Fern Avengers

Project by group chsparfittspring2018

Info

Explore Work on this next!
What do we know about plants from our experiences outside of school? What have we discovered in class and background research? What questions about plants interest us?
Research Question How can we impact the haploid generation of C ferns?
Predictions What are the possible outcomes of our study given the variables we are working with? What is our explanation for why and how we think this will happen?
Experimental Design The plan for our experiment is to have four petri dishes, one control, one with packed with gametophytes-creating limited space, one with the gametophyte spread out, and the last one will be isolated, the only one in the dish. We are trying to see if we can induce asexual reproduction with the...
Conclusion What claim can we make from our experiment? What are possible explanations for our results? How do the data we collected and our reasoning with scientific ideas support our claim? What future experiments could be done to expand on the results of this experiment?

Updates

Get to know your team’s scientist mentor, who will encourage and guide you through the scientific process of discovery. The more you share your ideas and research info, the more your mentor can help. You may also hear from a scientist mentor liaison who will be helping all the teams in your class.
PlantingScience Staff
has been updated by administrator
PlantingScience Staff
has been updated by administrator
Laura Klein
said

Dear teachers, mentors, and student scientists,

Thank you all so much for the time and dedication you have devoted to these projects over the last few weeks. Ms. Parfitt and Ryan are truly dedicated educators, bringing science and enthusiasm to the classroom. The scientist mentors have done an excellent job being adaptive, interacting with their groups, and helping to do good scientists. And finally, the students have done a great job asking questions, collecting data, and taking care of their ferns! Great job everyone, I hope that this experience has taught you that plants [ferns] are some of the most interesting organisms in biology.

All the best,

Laura, scientist liaison  

Maddy
said

 Thank you for helping us through this experiment. This is, unfortunately, our last day on the website so we can no longer communicate or upload any updates for the project. Our hypothesis proved to be true, whereas the Hermaphrodites ended up self fertillizing, and we thought you would know so we uploaded our final photos of it for you to see. once again, thank you for all the help, it was much needed!

   With Regards,

   Mack, Caitlyn, and Maddie.

Mack
uploaded scienceposter.pdf in project files
Mack
uploaded cferns.png, cferns2.png in project files
Maddy
said

The arrows aren't relative to the hermaphrodites, it is just a part of the dissecting scope that we couldn't move away. The Hermaphrodites are very healthy today, we are seeing new and healthy sporophytes. We will keep you updated.

Magaly Rincon-Zachary
said

To what structure are the arrows pointing?

Caitlyn
said

We added some photos of what we have been seeing. Some of the Hermaphrodites are sprouting. As you can see in the photos

Caitlyn
uploaded ferns.png and 2 more files in project files
PlantingScience Staff
joined the project
Maddy
said

Update: The brown hermaphrodite was not a hermaphrodite. It was a male and was immediately removed. We have replaced it with a healthy hermaphrodite and the experiment continues.

Maddy
said

The Hermaphrodites have grown in both size and population. We have plucked 8 hermaphrodites from the Control dish, putting 4 in the second one, 3 in the third one, and 1 in the fourth one. Over the next day, we have noticed two of the Hermaphrodites have turned Brown. The ones that are turning brown are ones that we have transported suggesting damage while we moved them.

Maddy
said

There's has been no significant change, just a higher abundance of Rhyzoids. 

Mack
said

Yes! We aren't expected to see any hermaphrodites or males until next week but we are continuing to look out for them. And the picture that was just uploaded was what we saw in the microscope today.

Mack
uploaded WIN_20180411_09_43_11_Pro.jpg in project files
Magaly Rincon-Zachary
said

Great! So you will know the antherigen has been released when you can identify males on your plate, correct?

Mack
said

Hello

We will be extracting the hermaphrodites after they release the antheridiogen because we will need to have males in our control. Right now we have them all in one dish, we're using it as a harvesting dish until we pluck out some hermaphrodites.

Thank you for the article.

Magaly Rincon-Zachary
said

The article I uploaded contains good background information about the role of the antheridiogen in sex determination. The analysis of the results may be difficult to understand because you don't have the necessary knowledge in statistics. So, don't get frustrated; read the abstract and introduction; ignore materials & methods and results sections; examine figures 1 and 2 and read the discussion.  Discuss among yourselves what you understand from reading the article and write down the questions you have. Post your questions and we will try to answer them. I hope the article helps.

Maddy said you would take out the hermaphrodites BEFORE antheridiogen  is released. How do you know when the antheridiogen is released?

 

Happy learning

Magaly Rincon-Zachary
uploaded Antheridiogen concentration.pdf in project files
Maddy
said

We uploaded a file of the picture for what we are going to do.

Maddy
uploaded WIN_20180409_10_38_11_Pro.jpg in project files
Maddy
said

 Looking more into this project, our question is is if we can see into the Hermaphrodite to Male ratio to determine if our Hermaphrodtie will be able to reproduce asexually through isolation processes. Are there any resources that would help us understand this better?  Also, Antheridiogen occurs when the first Gametophyte appears, the Hermaphrodite will then release this  antheridiogen  that will change the sex of the males. We will be extracting the Hermaphrodites from the males BEFORE antheridiogen  is released.

   Thanks.

Maddy
said

 Looking more into this project, our question is is if we can see into the Hermaphrodite to Male ratio to determine if our Hermaphrodtie will be able to reproduce asexually through isolation processes. Are there any resources that would help us understand this better? Thanks.

Magaly Rincon-Zachary
said

Hello Fern Avengers,

I read your experimental design.  However, it isn't clear to me what your question is. Is it that you want to know if spore density affects the germination of spores? or is it that you want to know if spore density affects the gametophyte sexual determination? What do you think antheridiogen does?  I feel you need to be more specific with your question and formulate the hypothesis.  I suggest you get together and work on the question and hypothesis.

I look forward to hearing from you,

Magaly

 

Laura Klein
joined the project
Mack
updated the project info
Maddy
updated the project info
Caitlyn
updated the project info
Mack
replaced project picture
Maddy
said

Hey, we are logging into this website and we need to start finalizing our project, and we haven't heard from you in a while, just wondering.

Kim Allyn Parfitt
updated the project info
Maddy
said

Hello, do you have any resources that would help us in our research in the Cferns? Thank you for your help.

Mack
said

I was wondering if we could look at hermaphrodite to male ratio. I think it would be interesting to see the result of putting them closer together so when the hermaphrodite releases her chemical it would reach more of the spores so most of them would be male. I was also wondering if there was a way that we could induce asexual reproduction with the first hermaphrodite. Maybe that would mean spacing them out more but we don't have a way of knowing which spore will open up first.

Magaly Rincon-Zachary
said

Hello everyone,

I apologize for not joining the team earlier.  I am excited about working with you.  I realized from your comments you have a good understanding the difference between haploid and diploid cells and your project is about the life cycle of ferns. I am curious about the questions you are asking.

Magaly Rincon-Zachary
joined the project
Hailey Jane Ryan
said

Hi team! Now that you are learning more about the alternation of generations, I hope you will work together to discuss where in the life cycle you want to experiment.  Remember if you focus on things like how fast they germinate, or rhyzoid growth, or gametophyte growth, male to hermaphrodite ratio, or time to sexual maturation, you are more likely to collect data in the time we have for the project.  Maybe start your conversation with "I wonder if..." and get a good discussion ging.  Remeber that just like our aquaterrapod experiments, your investigation needs to be rooted in good science reasoning.  That's where your mentor can really help you by asking questions, providing resources, and pushing your thinking. 

Mack
said

Haploid cells only have half of the genetic information needed for a chromosome. Diploid cells carry all of the information for the chromosome. Diploid cells are bigger because they have all off the inform and haploid cells are smaller due to the fact that not all the information is there. What I find interesting about alternation of generations is that the plant can asexually reproduce if it needs to. It can sexually reproduce and create variation but for the next generation, it doesn't have to do the same thing. It can choose a different male or choose to asexually reproduce after the other ones become male.

Maddy
said

Haploid cells are different from diploid cells because Haploid cells only carry half the genetic information, while diploid cells contain all of the genetic information. One thing I found interesting about Cferns is that they can be haploid while still functioning fully. For example, if we, us humans, are Diploid we are big because we have all the information, and if we're haploid we're going to be small because we don't have enough genetic information. One thing about their alternation of generations is that if they're asexual they're going to be identical generation by generation, while if they're sexually reproductive they're going to have different forms and characteristics. Ferns make spores, which can be male or female. One generation can be fertilized for sexual reproduction while the next generation can be asexual so they're reproducing its identical offspring by itself.

Caitlyn
joined the project
PlantingScience Staff
said

Hi Team!

Quick reminder: In order to maintain student privacy, please refrain from posting last names, email addresses, links to Google docs, social media handles, etc. We will remove them as we find them.

Thank you for your cooperation!

Mack
said

Hello my name is Mackenzie I'm in ninth grade. I like to learn science by interacting with things and looking at pictures and models. I also like learning science by videos and documentaries.

Maddy
said

Hello, My name is Madeline, I am in the 9th grade, and I enjoy to learn science particularly through visual behaviors along with interacting with different 3D models so it's easier to understand their functions. I am looking forward to learning with you all so I am taking this opportunity to thank you for being on the team!

Hailey Jane Ryan
joined the project
Kim Allyn Parfitt
said

Hi! I am sorry that one of your team members is not here today. We'll make sure she gets logged in, In the meantime, introduce yourself to your mentor, PS team, and Laura Klein by telling them what grade you are in, how you like to learn science, and one other piece of information that will help them understand how they can best work with you!

Kim Allyn Parfitt
joined the project
Maddy
joined the project
Mack
joined the project